How To Refinish Kitchen Cabinets

Refinish Kitchen Cabinets

Kitchen cabinets contain the tools, spices and cookware which is required to carry out everything. So they wear out over time, it is only natural. However, before you write off your broken, chipped, or outdated cabinets, there is one last route to take: refinishing. A good quality refinishing job will keep the kitchen cabinets in excellent condition and extend their life.

If you believe you can take on an advanced home project of this scale, the first thing you need to know is how much time you must commit to getting it done. Refinishing kitchen cabinets can take anywhere between four to eight weekends, or in other words, 60 to 130 hours. Keep in mind that the kitchen may not be functional while completing this undertaking, too. Here are the steps involved.

Clean the surfaces

Clean the surfaces

Before=refinishing, it is recommended to start the project by scrubbing the kitchen cabinetry thoroughly. To do so, carefully remove the cabinetry from the walls, clean them and dry the wood completely. It is probably a good idea to number or label the cabinet doors so that you will put them back in the right place. While sanding or painting, make sure not to paint or sand off over the marks. The labels for the holes for the hinges also need to match, so that you can quickly determine which door goes where.

Protect Both Yourself And The Rest Of The Kitchen.

Spread cloths on top of the countertops and use them to cover the floors and appliances. Don’t forget to wear gloves and eye protection while using a wood cleaner.

Soak The Hardware

Soak The Hardware

Since the hardware might also be in need of a good cleaning, place them in a big basin with soap water for about 30 minutes. Scrub them lightly with the help of a soft brush before rinsing. Once they are properly cleaned, allow the hardware to dry entirely. After that is done, apply a coat of polish and allow the pieces dry once again.

Soak The Hardware

After all that is done, strip the cabinets. However, this is where the process can get complicated. Make sure that the workspace is within a well-ventilated area, and preferably outside. To determine which stripping agent is best for the cabinetry, figure out what type of finish is already done on the wood. However, there is no way to find out other than trial and error. If the cabinetry has a wax finish, for example, put a few drops of turpentine on the wood. If the solution dissolves, the assumption was correct. Other possibilities include lacquer, shellac, paint, vinyl, varnish, polyurethane, penetrating oil, or a water-based finish. Each of these has its own specifications for removal or care.